Association Between Pelvic Floor Dysfunction and Metabolic Syndrome

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction and Metabolic Syndrome

Authors

  • Hafiza Neelam Muneeb Riphah College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Riphah International University, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Maryam Amjad Riphah College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Riphah International University, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Hifsa Mumtaz Khaliq Riphah College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Riphah International University, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Kainat Shaukat Riphah College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Riphah International University, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Maria Shabbir Riphah College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Riphah International University, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Sidra Shafique Riphah College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Riphah International University, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Muhammad Faizan Hamid University of South Asia, Cantt campus, Lahore

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.54393/pbmj.v5i8.749

Keywords:

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction, Pelvic Organ Prolapse, Urinary Incontinence, Stress Urinary Incontinence, Cross Sectional Study

Abstract

The failure to properly relax and coordinate your pelvic floor muscles in order to perform a bowel movement is known as pelvic floor dysfunction. The current cross-sectional study's goal is to establish a link between metabolic syndrome and pelvic floor disorders. The syndrome is made up of a number of variables, including “insulin resistance, visceral obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia, endothelial dysfunction, hereditary vulnerability, increased blood pressure, hypercoagulable condition, and psychological stress.” Objective: Association between “pelvic floor dysfunction and metabolic syndrome” in middle aged women. Methods: This article summarizes research from Jinnah Hospital that sought to ascertain the relationship between metabolic syndrome and abnormalities of the pelvic floor. 277 female patients were chosen for this cross-sectional investigation using a non-probability convenient sampling strategy. According to the inclusion criteria, information on female hospital patients aged 40 to 77 years old was gathered. Self-made questionnaires were filled by respective patients. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 21. Results:  There is no association between “pelvic floor dysfunction and metabolic syndrome” as the value is greater than 0.05. Conclusions: In middle-aged women, we were unable to find a connection between “metabolic syndrome and pelvic floor dysfunction.” We are well aware that women's dysfunction negatively impacts their quality of life and puts a strain on the nation as a whole on the socioeconomic front. Finding solutions to reduce this stress will benefit women and the nation as a whole in the long run.

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Published

2022-08-31

How to Cite

Neelam Muneeb, H. ., Amjad, M. ., Mumtaz Khaliq, H. ., Shaukat, K. ., Shabbir, M. ., Shafique, S. ., & Faizan Hamid, M. . (2022). Association Between Pelvic Floor Dysfunction and Metabolic Syndrome: Pelvic Floor Dysfunction and Metabolic Syndrome. Pakistan BioMedical Journal, 5(8), 55–59. https://doi.org/10.54393/pbmj.v5i8.749

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